Category Archives: international marketing

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Let´s work together!

Do you want to take your translation business a bit further? Do you want to start your translation business and be dedicated mainly to translating?

Are you tired of wasting your time doing: Creditor and Debtor control, invoicing, sending reminders for unpaid invoices, searching for help for high workloads, fixing computer problems and doing never ending marketing campaigns with no success?

Franchise is what you need! Do what you do best – Translate! Jensen Localization provides you with expertise, resources and support.

Would you like more information? Contact us without compromise.

Transfiere, Malaga, February 2017

Many of you may think that if an event takes place in the wonderful Malaga, it must be related to tourism, real estate or relaxation.

However, there are quite a lot of tech experts coming from Andalusia Spain currently working in several parts of Europe to develop new technologies and procedures.

In Jensen Localization we believe that Spanish entrepreneurs could come out with good solutions that can benefit other European countries. We, with a long experience in localization, can take these ideas, inventions, and solutions to other parts of Europe.

Some of our services are: translation of websites, marketing campaigns, brochures, packaging, documentation and much more. That may help to expand your business globally.

Our IT Manager, Manuel Blanquet, and I took part in this event to show that in a company is very important that all parts work together and complement each other to always deliver the best results for our clients.

Manuel Blanquet and I representing Jensen Localization, at Transfiere, Málaga 2017.

Now let’s go back to Transfiere event. Not only big Spanish organizations as INTA, Telefonica, Clarke Modet & Co, AERTEC Solutions, Fundación Repsol were present, but also others from around the globe, as China Telecom Europe, Eureka Network, Eli-Alps Laser Research Center, SCST State Committee on Science and Technology of the Republic of Belarus, ISETA (TAMBAGA NETWORKING) SENEGAL, to name a few.

Indeed was a huge and interesting event for technological development, there were projects on robotics, drone aviation, elderly assistance and brain waves reader device. These are signs telling us that we are already taking part of the IV Industrial revolution in Spain.

It is also quite important to mention that during this event the King Felipe VI of Spain was there to show his support to technological development.

We at Jensen Localization believe that tech development is a very important matter and to keep sharing and expanding knowledge around the globe is very important to have a translation partner. If you are ready to go global with your project, product or invention. Contact us!

Emigration Expo 2017, Houten, the Netherlands.

Emigration is a word from Latin, related to movement. We have been migrating since the beginning of human race time. Our species is supposed to originate from Africa and have from there emigrated to all over the world. It is one of our pre-set human skills.

This movement of people can be seen as beneficial or prejudicial by contemporary governments. The truth is that this is something that is difficult to control, even though it could appear that governments from all over the world are increasingly trying to control this migration influx as much as possible in order to let into their countries only the most suitable candidates to become productive citizens.

To mention an historical example related to migration control attempts, in 1912 the immigrant’s hotel was inaugurated in the port of Buenos Aires, Argentina. It could lodge up to 3,000 new arrivals, who received free board, job training and help finding employment. From those times and earlier there were attempts to provide the necessaries for people willing or forced to emigrate.

Former Immigrants Hotel in the port of Buenos Aires, Argentina, currently immigration museum. Wikipedia.

The Emigration Fair known as “EmigratieBeurs” in Dutch, is a yearly event that this year reached its 21st birthday. The interesting thing about this detail is that in several countries like Argentina 21 is the required age for a citizen to be able to travel or emigrate abroad without the supervision or legal consent of their parents.

Banner from the Emigration Expo 2017, Houten, the Netherlands.

This year the Emigration Fair displays several different regions, businesses and organizations from around the globe looking for skilled workers and investors. Some of the regions represented at this expo were countries like Germany, France, Sweden, Denmark, Norway, U.S.A., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Kenya, Panama, the Dutch Caribbean, etc.

Flags at the Expo entrance representing some of the participating countries.

The most popular type of workers they were searching for were the ones related to health services. However, in some regions, they were having a long list of wanted professionals.

In this emigration process there are several steps to name some of them:

  • Getting your visa ready.
  • Finding a new home.
  • New school for children.
  • Finding a satisfactory job.
  • Relocating your belongings and pet.
  • Translation of documentation.

To make things happen several companies need to collaborate:

  • Real states
  • Transport agencies
  • Tax advising companies
  • Regional governments
  • Schools
  • Language learning institutes
  • Translation agencies

Jensen Localization took part in this event because we believe that we are all part of a network that works together to convey the necessary information to every person willing to relocate. The information should be in their language to facilitate their assimilation into a new society. We have the knowledge to translate documentation, websites, marketing campaigns, adapt language courses to specific speakers, and much more. Contact us if you want to know how we can help you.

 

The British & International Franchise Exhibition 2017

The British & International Franchise Exhibition, Olympia, London 20 – 21 Jan 2017 Banner

On Friday 20th and Saturday 21st, Jan 2017 a very interesting exhibition took place, where we had the opportunity to visit not only big players as McDonalds and RE/MAX but also other well-established businesses looking to expand via franchising. In addition, there were plenty of conferences and workshops to learn about the procedures and tactics used in franchising.

Here is a short summary of all the useful notes to be considered from all the workshops and conferences that we took part in, for both the franchisor and the franchisee:

  • Be realistic and not overambitious.
  • Take legal advice from a franchise lawyer.
  • Learn about the viability of the business you are about to embrace.
  • Understand the context and the numbers related to franchise finances.
  • Search for expert advice.
  • If you are planning to borrow money for your franchise project, talk to more than one bank.
  • Read carefully the franchise agreement.
  • Franchising laws vary from one country to another and there are some that have none.
  • Usually, franchise agreements tend to last 5 years, but there are exceptions.
  • The initial fee usually covers training and additional equipment (for example banners).
  • The monthly fee usually covers management and maintenance service plus a part for global marketing.
  • Remember that to be a franchisee means you will have to maintain a minimum level of sales. There is usually a minimum performance clause in each agreement.
  • To acquire a franchisee may take in between 6 weeks to 4 months.
  • Do not rush through the process or you will end up with the wrong franchisee.
  • There is no get rich quick scheme!
  • Do not think that the franchisor will get the leads for you; they may help but is up to the franchisee to grow.
  • Usually, to recover your investment as a franchisee may take up to 2 years, do not expect profits in the first year.
  • Learn about the financial information for both franchisor and franchisee.
  • It is always better to have a couple of meetings face to face.
  • Be prepared and flexible when approaching a potential franchisee.
  • Be aware of time differences.
  • Follow a system. Make the system easy to learn for others.
  • Invest in training creation.
  • Know when it is time to stop holding hands. A franchisee is very similar to raising a child.
  • The franchisor should train, coach, motivate and monitor. But do not suffocate the franchisee.
  • Always protect your trademark at the earliest possible.
  • Understand cultural differences.
  • A franchisee candidate can be: an organization looking for diversification, a strong business leader looking for their own venture, an investor with strong management skills, and a company similar to the franchisor.
  • Do not set up a lot of franchisees in a short period of time if you know that you will not handle them properly.
  • Prepare in case things go wrong. If your franchisee fails you may be dragged to failure too.
  • If possible became a member of a franchise association as BFA (British Franchise Association) or EFF (European Franchise Federation).
  • To success in franchising align and embrace brand values.
  • Visit the franchisor and the franchisee office.
  • Listen to everyone’s ideas.
  • Work with a tested system and implement new solutions when required.
  • Recruit and develop quality people with problem-solving skills.
  • Be aware of taxation practices related to franchising.

    At The British & International Franchise Exhibition, Olympia, London 20 – 21 Jan 2017

 

At this moment you may be asking yourself… Why would a translation company go to a Franchising exhibition?

There are two answers to this question.

The first answer is: because every company that wants to have franchisees requires translation services to expand their global scope.

Any company that would like to enter the European market require a trustable translation partner.

This will allow them to translate and localize legal documentation, marketing campaigns, and their websites in order to reach the desired locations. At Jensen Localization, we have 16 years of experience providing reliable, accurate and fast translation and localization services. If your company is willing to have franchisees all over Europe, get in touch not to be lost in translation.

The second answer is: that we are the first translation company to franchise our formula. We are a recognized trademark under the EU trademarks registry. We have extensive experience in the localization market. We have 3 offices that allowed us to gain experience in providing localization services. A central office in order to have the others running smoothly and focusing on translation as their main focus rather than IT, Administration and Marketing. If you would like to know more about being an ambassador of our company, contact us to schedule a visit to our office in Fuengirola, Spain.

At Jensen Localization, we hope that you found this article useful to help you succeed in your franchising plans. If you have suggestions or questions about this article e-mail us!

The Translation Landscape in Northern Europe: NTIF 2016 Malmö

It was 07:00 am on a cold autumn morning in Malaga. The plane to Copenhagen was heating the engines for taking off and I, the representative of Jensen Localization, was on board that plane.

After 3.5 hours of bumpy flying with plenty of turbulence, I reached Kastrup airport. My next objective was to get to the train station to reach Malmö, a small Swedish city right next to the mighty Baltic Sea opposite Copenhagen.

Tickets in the train station were only sold in machines; it was a premonition of what was lying ahead in this trip, the replacement of humans with machines. Science Fiction? A sad reality? Continue reading to find out what happens.

Two big guys asked all passengers for our IDs before entering the train platforms. The train arrived on time, and it speeded up while crossing the Øresund Bridge, an amazing piece of engineering. Once in Sweden, there was a border control. What for? I still do not know; we spent 25 minutes waiting for some controllers that never showed up.

Øresund Bridge,

Øresund Bridge, Øresund. Source: Wikipedia.

Before NTIF 2016

At Malmö central station the Sun was shining and however cold, I had some time to discover a bit the old town of this northern Venice.

Suellsbron bridge

Suellsbron Bridge

Christmas decorations in Malmö old town

Christmas decorations in Malmö old town

sculpture in Malmö

Optimistorkestern, the optimistic orchestra. It was erected in 1985 to celebrate the opening of the first pedestrian shopping street in Malmö.

That same night, I attended the NTIF 2016 welcome dinner, where I had the pleasure to meet very nice people from Sweden, Latvia, Poland, Hungary, and many other countries. We had a glass of champagne and some nice finger food while chatting. There were too many names to mention as there were more than 150 attendees, so it would be difficult to be fair to everyone.

Nicolás and Anne-Marie

With Anne-Marie Colliander Lind, one of the NTIF organizers.

After some tourism and socialising, it is time to start working

On the first day, the 24th November, there was a tight agenda that took us from all current issues and advances in the localization industry to periods of networking, eating, drinking coffee, and visiting booths.

The conferences made me think more about fuzzy matches. In the future, would it be possible to have standard rules for metrics? Would it be possible to use them globally? I believe that there is a real need for everyone in this business to make these metrics as consistent as possible, as we are currently forced to use the ones established by the big guys in this industry under their own rules.

What most of us already knew, or had a feeling about, was that online translation services might be the next step of evolution in our business. However, will they replace human project management? This is the reason why Translation.net and Matecat instant quote appeared on the market. Will they be successful? Time and customers will decide their fate.

And the day went by. The feared Machine Translation monster is growing, but we should not be afraid of losing our position in the translation process; all rule-based systems and the ones requiring coding will have to be reviewed by an IT specialist that would need to work closely with linguistic reviewers for the best results. The guys at Prompsit (the creators of Apertium, a free open-source machine translation platform) made some remarks about how dependent some organizations in Nordic countries were on these tools and highlighted the concern of Nordic institutions on the impact on Nordic students, who use them to cheat on their homework.

Cultural issues and the job of translators finally recognised

Around midday, I attended a very particular speech, which was not directly tackling translation issues, but culture issues. How do Nordic people look to outsiders? Michael Booth described each Nordic tribe from the perspective of a British man that married a Danish woman and moved to Denmark for love. Scandinavia may seem like the new utopia for many people around the globe, but it also has its downsides. Do you want to know what the similarities between Danish and Norwegian languages are? Have a look at this article on our blog.

typical Dane

A typical Dane, according to Michael Booth.

Because energy moves the planet and our fast developing society, we are happy to see initiatives like the one at one of Europe’s leading energy companies: DONG (for Danish Oil and Natural Gas). With around 6,500 employees, they are planning to increase the visibility of translators in corporate and government organizations. If you are a translator, it is time to say: Finally! Or Hurray!

Florian Faes from Slator updated us on the latest news on the translation industry: the rise of MT, the battle for TransPerfect, Lionbridge reorganization, and how SDL went back to the roots. He also talked about Who Went Where, as the localization industry is one with the highest employees mobility. I am well aware of it! Northern winds brought me back to the warm South, although houses are warmer in northern European countries, you know.

When we were approaching the end of the day, all of us held our hands together and sang Kum ba yah (not really, but it would have been nice) during the presentation about networking tactics by John Di Rico. He made us understand that united we prevail and that business cards should be exchanged with both hands in Japan. Remember this on your next business trip!

After a one-hour break, the time for the real deal arrived: the Dining and Dancing event sponsored by Moravia & Ciklopea, which was indeed a total success. I was surprised by the charisma of Moravia and Ciklopea representatives and amazed by the dancing skills of the participants; that would make any Latino dancer jealous! I suspect that not only Cecilia and Anne-Marie may have some Latin roots.

NTIF dinner

NTIF dinner with Swedish delicacies

NTIF dinner

Time to dance with some Swedish music!

Sales and marketing strategies for translation companies

The last day of the NTIF, 25th November, focused on conferences about emerging business opportunities and again the dichotomy between Machine and Men in translation. The needs to cope with new challenges in the industry: transparency, costs reduction, data control, and a sustainable business model. Very nice on paper, but difficult to achieve in reality.

In the morning, another beneficial and challenging factor that was discussed was the media growth of Facebook and Netflix and their constant struggle to increase video production, as well as subtitling, dubbing/voice over and graphic localization. Adding to this growing cake is the lack of banking rewards for big money savers that is pushing them to invest in growing industries, the translation industry being one of them.

Midday conferences focused on mergers and acquisitions, buy and to be bought. They brought to our awareness that company owners do not live forever, even if they want to, and that sooner or later a merging will even shock or benefit any LSP.

The last two conferences that I was able to attend were about the enormous impact of social media and browsing on our lives, and the importance of creating proper content to reach our target audience. Both of them made a convergence that the old sales method is in decay and that feelings, emotions, connection with your audience, quality and added value are key points in reaching your objectives.

It was a pity, but I could not stay until the very end of the event because I had a plane to catch in Copenhagen to be back in Spain. Luckily, I was able to follow the final part of the event via the Nordic Translation Industry Forum Facebook page.

We, at Jensen Localization, would like to suggest that the 2017 NTIF should be hosted in Fuengirola. Do you know why? Because it is one of the Andalusian cities most populated by Nordic people (according to the 2014 statistics, there were registered 4,500 Finnish, 1,750 Swedish, 1,200 Danish and 800 Norwegians). It is warm, beautiful, with a balanced combination of beach and mountains, you will feel at home!

If you were in the NTIF and I did not have the pleasure of meeting you or dancing with you, please feel free to write me or contact Jensen Localization for any question you may have or just to say hello and keep in touch.

Thank you, Cecilia Enbäck, Anne-Marie Colliander Lind and all NTIF participants for such a memorable event that already has a place in the translation landscape.