Networking in the translation industry. The GALA conference in Seville.

GALA roll-upIt is time to find cooperators and not competitors. Competition exists and will always be there, and actually I think that our competitors are more outside the translation industry that inside.

Compared to other industries, I think that the translation industry is quite collaborative, long before the term networking term was coined.

Therefore, we are very used to do networking. We attend congresses and seminars where we find both freelancers and translation companies with whom we discuss opportunities for collaboration, because even if we do the same, there is always something where you are the best and something where you need help.

The last event we attended was the GALA conference in Seville, Spain, held in the end of March.

It was the first time we attended a GALA event; we attended conferences in the past such as Localization World, or TAUS Summits, but we never attended any event from GALA. And I must say that it was nice to be back in a translation event.

I thought it was going to be a European event, so to speak, and it came as a nice surprise to see that there were people from all over the world, from the US to South Korea and a large representation of Argentinean companies.

From this blog I want to thank the GALA organisers for organising a networking event where, in a very few minutes, we had the opportunity to meet around 60 people, which is absolutely not bad.

Does this mean that I will make business with each person I met? That would be great, but it is not the purpose of a networking event. In a networking event you get a first picture of a person or business, and it is not until you are back in your office that you start contacting those that attracted your attention most. Do not be afraid if you do not close a deal after a networking event, or if you do not hear soon from someone you met. Maybe at that moment there was not a need to get in touch, but that need may arise later and be sure you will be contacted if they need you.

So, do not worry about preparing a perfect sales pitch for a networking event. Instead, try to get information from your counterparts, see how you can help them and they will in return ask you how they can help you. And it is then business may come.

Attending all sessions was completely impossible, for obvious reasons, so I had to make a choice. Due to my job position, I focused on the sales speeches, and I enjoyed very much the open discussion about collaborative selling with Anne-Marie Colliander Lindt from Inkrea.

Despite companies having a sales specialist, companies need to be aware of the fact that all departments are part of the sales cycle. The whole staff needs to be aware of it too, and for that they need information and training.

For example, if the IT department helps the production department, PMs and translators will be able to work more efficiently, and therefore, the client will trust the company more and this can lead to more sales.

PMs are the ones talking with clients on a frequent basis, they are the ones clients will ask when they need help, and they are the ones getting important feedback from the client that can help the sales staff to prepare specific offers and proposals to increase sales.

And this is true not only for translation companies, but for any company. Communication, proactivity, team spirit and thinking about the general benefits and not the individual ones will be crucial in the success of your company; no matter how good your translations are or how much you invest in technology.

TAUS Review. The Data issue.

As a translation and localization company constantly trying to improve the industry and narrowing the linguistic and cultural gap between countries, we are proud to be a member of the Translation Automation User Society (TAUS). Like TAUS, we too want to help the world communicate better and we are happy to share with you their online magazine, addressed to anyone interested in globalization and better communication across countries and cultures.

In their latest edition, the “data” edition, TAUS talks about data related to the translation industry, also called translation-related-data, which concerns who is involved with the data, what the is data about, what the data source is and when the data is originated. Since many find that there is not enough data regarding the translation industry, specially for Asian languages, this topic is further discussed in this magazine.

Another interesting article worth reading is about Google Translate, which answers many questions one might have regarding the world’s most used online translation tool.

In this issue TAUS also brings you on a trip across the world from Ethiopia to Japan. Translation is used everywhere and even though the world is starting to become more and more homogeneous there are still places where much improvement will be required.

To learn more about the translation industry in both Ethiopia and Japan and much more, please follow this link to TAUS Review Magazine.

And if you want to learn how translation can be a useful tool for your company’s worldwide presence, do not hesitate to contact us.

When ‘No’ doesn’t exactly Mean ‘No’

Our colleague Magnus, native Swedish speaker, sent us this picture from an automatic teller machine in Spain:

Translation error in automatic teller machine.

The quality is not very good, and we have removed sensitive data (and of course the name of the Bank), but some of you will spot the error easily.

For those of you who are not familiar with the Swedish grammar, here is the explanation:

We all know how to withdraw cash from these machines, don’t we? If we want to continue with the operation, we press Yes (Ja in Swedish). And if we do not want to continue with such operation, we press No, which should be Nej in Swedish. However, as you can see in the picture, it reads Inte, which means Not (the particle used to build negative sentences in Swedish).

This is a very common error in companies that prefer to take shortcuts in their international communication strategy. First impressions are very important, and this apparently tiny error can prevent this bank from getting a client. It does not prevent you from withdrawing money but, would you trust a bigger operation in a bank that does not give you accurate information in your language?

Oral, written and visual communication are extremely important for companies, no matter if they are an international bank or a small shop in a tourist area. The way you communicate things will define the way your clients and potentials will perceive the services you are offering them, and approaching them in their language will make them feel at ease and make a step in the so difficult world of getting and engaging clients.

If you want to know how we can help you to go global and break language barriers thanks to translation, do not hesitate to contact us.

 

Translation and Business Opportunities between Norway and Spain

Recently, I attended a seminar about business opportunities between Norway and Spain, held at the Malaga Chamber of Commerce. The speakers were the Norwegian Ambassador in Spain, Johan Vibe, the President of the Spanish-Norwegian Chamber of Commerce, Carmen Sanz, and the Norwegian Trade and Tourism Councillor, Gaute Hagerup, who is also Director of Innovation Norway in Madrid.

These seminars are useful to learn about the many business opportunities that can arise between countries that, at first sight, look so different.

What can Spain offer Norway?

The Norwegian representatives were quite surprised to see the high number of high quality technological companies, many of them related to radio frequency technology, located at the Technological Park of Andalusia (PTA) in Malaga. But that was not all.

Malaga is a very appealing destination for Norwegian companies, for several reasons:

  • Quality of life. Excellent climate conditions, excellent food and excellent places to practise outdoor activities.
  • Air connections. Malaga has been a tourist destination for Norwegians for years (in 2014, 1.5 million Norwegians visited Spain, most of them went to Andalusia), so there are several direct flights connecting Malaga and different Norwegian cities, such as Oslo and Bergen. This is really an advantage compared to Madrid, which has less and much more expensive connections.
  • The Norwegian church in Fuengirola. This is a great place to get in contact with other Norwegians living in the area.
  • Norwegian schools. More and more popular in Spain, there is one in Arroyo de la Miel. This enables them to commute to Spain and maintaining the link to their country and culture.

As a result, more and more Norwegians are buying properties in Spain. There are around 60,000 Norwegians living in Spain, most of them in the Costa del Sol. Their acquisitions account for 5 % of the foreign purchases in the Real Estate industry in Spain.

What does Norway import from Spain? Spanish exporters, this is important for you!

  • Civil Engineering and Construction: despite being a small country, they have a big need to improve their transport network, including roads, railway and harbours.
  • Consumer goods: clothing, shoes, furniture, decoration, home linen.
  • Welfare services, mainly for elderly people: it goes beyond building residences for elderly people. In Norway, they consider the physical environment as part of the patient treatment. This, together with the good reputation of Spanish doctors, makes the Costa del Sol an excellent place for pre- and post-surgery treatments.
  • Wine: there are more and more Spanish wines being sold in Norway.
  • Health care: Norway is short of medical professionals (doctors, nurses) as well as medicines.
  • Nautical industry: industrial and tourism crafts and auxiliary services for the nautical industry.
  • Knowledge: related to all these industries, there are more and more engineers, doctors, nurses and Spanish teachers working in Norway.

All these imports from Spain contribute greatly to Norwegian exports. What does Norway export to the rest of the world?

  • Technology (nautical and telecommunications)
  • Renewable energies
  • Oil and gas
  • Nautical transportation services (transport, goods insurance)
  • Aquaculture
  • E-Health
  • Extreme cold weather clothing

In all these industries, translation plays an important role. As stated by the President of the Spanish-Norwegian Chamber of Commerce, Carmen Sanz; despite Norwegians having a high command of English, you will need to deliver documents in Norwegian, especially if you are participating in public tender offers. Therefore, you have to consider translation as part of your investment in Norway.

Even if the negotiation takes place in English, it is probable that the contracts signed between the companies are in Norwegian. Again, you will need a professional translator for this.

As explained in other occasions, for B2C companies it is essential to address their customers in their own language. It is good for the company’s branding and credibility in the new market, and it also helps to reach more customers. Even if people have a high command of a foreign language (let’s say English), when they search the Internet, they tend to do it in their native tongue. Therefore, for your SEO/SEM strategy, you will probably be more successful if you run a local SEO/SEM strategy in Norwegian.

At Jensen Localization we can help you in all this. We can help you to get in touch with companies offering internationalization services in Norway, they will let you know where to start. Once you know what you want to do in Norway, we can help you on your language needs, either English or Norwegian.

If you are a Norwegian company selling abroad, we can also help you! At Jensen Localization we work both ways, delivering high quality translations from and into the Norwegian languages (Bokmal and Nynorsk) to clients all over the world, in a variety of industries. Feel free to contact us for further information about how we can help you to go global.

Summary of 2014

For new visitors and for those who do not want to check our archives month by month, we are now offering you a selection of articles posted in 2014, so that you can get a quick update.

During 2014, our blog has been addressing issues so important to our clients such as how they can save money on translation.

On articles Misconceptions about Localization Costs for Companies I and II, we explain you in detail how you can easily save costs on your translation by applying easy procedures:

You may be interested in sharing theses posts with your content creators before starting your translation adventure.

We have also talked about procedures that may not be so known to our clients, but that are quite important in order to consider a translation job as finished. In October, we talked about the testing phase, which usually takes place after a website has been translated.

In a global world and a global crisis, all companies want to increase their sales. And in order to do it, they increase their marketing strategies. And as they want to sell abroad, marketing becomes international marketing. And, guess what? Translation is an extremely important tool in international marketing! For this reason, in March we published an interesting article about the relationship between Market Entry Strategies and Localization.

For translators, we published in November an interesting article about how to prepare your files for translation with SDL Trados Studio and make sure that you only translate what you need. Your clients will also appreciate it, since this also prevents charging for text that is not actually to be translated.

Finally, we also published an article about our new service, the Controlled TM+MT Environment, available for companies that do their translations in-house but do not have a system in place for keeping consistency and reusing translations.

We hope to continue writing about interesting topics in the translation, localization and interpreting industry. Is there any topic of interest for you that you would like us to research on and write about? Feel free to propose it in the comments section or contact us!